Cree 101 – Final Project

29 Jan

After doing the first assignment, and learning how to introduce my family in Cree, I decided that for my final project I wanted to work with my family to do my “How To” video. I want to work with my Grandfather and Mother to  create a video on how to make a recipe that our family has passed down many years.

I am excited to do this project because both my Mother and Grandfather aren’t able to speak (much) Cree, and I want to be able to share this experience with them. Through conversations I have learned that my great-grandmother was able to speak English, French, Cree and Michif, so this is important for me to be able to do with my family.

To prepare I am going to sit down with my grandpa and ask him to teach me the recipe beforehand, so I can properly translate it (as well as get the groceries). I might do some recording of this to incorporate into my final project. I then want to make a script with the steps, so that when I record it will be easy. I am going to record on my phone and will either use Microsoft Movie Maker (I used this for Cree 100 and it was very easy) or Adobe Premier (already familiar with this editing tool). I am going to post my final video onto Youtube.

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Cree 101 – Introduction

9 Jan

tānsi (hello)!

I am very excited to be taking Cree 101 this semester! My name is Samantha Douglas and I am a high school teacher in Moose Jaw. I took Cree 100 last semester, and am happy to continue learning this semester.

I currently teach math at Vanier Collegiate in Moose Jaw, as well as teach/develop some courses for Regina Catholic Online School. I took my first degree through the University of Regina in Education, with a major in mathematics and a minor in Visual Art. For the past 7 years I have taught many different courses, but currently I teach mainly math, with some Catholic Studies and Native Studies courses. I am involved in the Student Representative Council, the yearbook, grade eight transitioning, and our school Treaty 4 group. Last year I made the decision to go back to school and applied to the First Nations University to obtain a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Indigenous Studies. I am taking two INDG classes this semester as well as Cree 100.

I am passionate about Indigenous issues in our country. I believe that Reconciliation is important and that Indigenous resurgence is crucial. Language revitalization is so incredibly important, as Indigenous languages should be thriving! Cree is a language that has been stolen from my family, so I am grateful to have the opportunity to learn this in my degree.

 

100 Days of Cree – Summary of Learning

6 Dec

tânsi!

I am so excited to share my summary of learning project.

I also created an introductory video to explain my process:

I think it is very important to, again, highlight the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. What I wanted to focus on, specifically, is the following:

  1. We call on the federal government to draft new Aboriginal education legislation with the full participation and informed consent of Aboriginal peoples. The new legislation would include a commitment to sufficient funding and would incorporate the following principles:

    iv. Protecting the right to Aboriginal languages, including the teaching of Aboriginal languages as credit courses

The entire purpose of my project is addressing this Call to Action, and creating a resource that can be utilized by anyone. It could meet outcomes for the nehiyawiwin curriculum.

Utilizing Flipgrid to have others learn Cree along with my students would be very beneficial for them. It can connect communities, and show them that there are other people in this world who also see the importance in revitalizing a language. Our flipgrid code is 100daysofcree

hây-hây,
thank you.

Summary of Learning

20 Nov

For my Summary of Learning I would like to make something that I can both hand in for this course, but utilize in the classroom. I am constantly trying to build up the resources I have available to teach, and this is a fantastic opportunity to do this. I began working with my students this semester on doing 100 Days of Cree, utilizing what I have been learning in this course as well as utilizing the book. The difficulties that I found were that I could not find time in my schedule to work with the students to create these videos, that it was difficult for them to say the words properly, and that I would need to get permission to use them for this project.

To alter my path, I have decided that I will make 100 videos of phrases and words that can be utilized as a resource in my classroom and for my school division. This will make much more sense, as I will have a greater control of how the words will sound and I can work on them on my own. I do want my students to be able to create the videos with their voices saying the words, because I think this is empowering for them and their education, as well as important for their peers to learn along side them, but I think that will be more of a “step 2” of my project. Once I complete the resource they can learn from it, and any classroom teacher could utilize it as well.

In all of my Indigenous Studies classes the topic of revitalizing Indigenous languages comes up with great importance. I want to incorporate that into my teaching practices as much as possible.

For logistics I will need to plan what words and sentences I will be using for the 100 “days”. I will, more than likely, use my Iphone to record myself saying the words, and use imovie to edit the videos. This is probably the quickest way to accomplish this, as well as makes it easy to keep the files on my phone to post on social media. I will host the videos on my class website so that all files can be found there.

Going into the second semester, I will be utilizing flipgrid to promote the 100 Days of Cree. Each day I will post a new phrase, and will encourage classes in our division to post their own videos of them learning and attempting the word. I want to utilize this tool so that our entire school division can learn together. It would be amazing to extend this project out into all social media, so that the students could see many people learning with them from all over their community, country or even the world!

I am excited to share what I have learned with this class, as well as with my students, school and school division.

 

Treaty Ed Camp 2018

15 Oct

This weekend I had the privilege of taking eight students to the UR S.T.A.R.S. Treaty Ed Camp. It was a fantastic event, filled with amazing sessions. This day is not only beneficial to myself as an educator, learning new things to apply to my own practice, but is beneficial for my students who we amazing enough to attend a conference on their weekend! We had one grade nine, two grade tens, and three grade twelves attend the event. At the beginning of the day I explained to them how they could utilize social media throughout the day, and showed them how to use the #TreatyEdCamp twitter hashtag. Throughout the day they were tweeting what they learned, and had amazing things to say. I was incredible impressed with their leadership, confidence, independence, and thirst for knowledge throughout the day. At the end of each session they would rush to find me, and tell me all that they learned. They took pages and pages of notes, and the conversation on the drive home was the most engaging discussion I have had about Treaty Education in a long time.

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Treaty 4 students with keynote speaker Erica Violet Lee

I wanted to be able to share some of the key themes that I learned throughout the day. One of the things that stood out most to me, as it came up from nearly every presenter I listened to, was language. Since taking my Cree class, I have noticed more and more, how much the topic of revitalizing Indigenous language comes up in talks about reconciliation. Language is a carrier for culture, and it is so crucial that we protect it! The beginning of the keynote speech, by Erica Violet Lee, began with a greeting in Cree. I was extremely excited when she began, because I recognized that I understood every single thing that she had said! This was the first time that I have ever actually understood another language (aside from bits and pieces of French) when it was actually being spoken to me. Language has been lost in my family for numerous generations, so I felt very empowered being able to understand what she was saying, and confident that I myself could deliver the same greeting. I clearly have a long way to go from here, but you have to start somewhere!

The keynote address was packed full of information and thought provoking statements. Lee often name dropped different authors, and I found myself adding books to my amazon cart as we went, like #IndianLovePoems by Tenille K. Campbell, and Nationhood Interrupted: Revitalizing nêhiyaw Legal Systems by Sylvia McAdams. She stated that it is “important that we are using the word genocide, because they don’t want to go there.” She talked about death, and mourning of that death, and being able to mourn without being weak. A powerful thing that she discussed was the idea of archives, and how the person who decides what goes in the archives is literally defining what knowledge is. She urged us to be conscious of this, as we are making our course outlines and deciding what content to teach, because we are also defining that knowledge. She shared stories of her time in high school, and the work she did to decolonize the racist mascot that she was told to identify with for so many years. So many powerful things were said during this keynote address, which will be available to watch through UR S.T.A.R.S. online!

“I wish I didn’t have to talk about colonialism everyday – What could we do if we weren’t always defending our humanity” – Erica Violet Lee

The first session I attended was Interfacing Indigenous Knowledge and Mathematics Education Through Math Fairs lead by Shana Graham. She discussed different ways we can assess mathematics that is more culturally broad. She discussed the idea that 1 + 1 = 2 is a Western way of thinking. When thinking about mathematics, the western viewpoint is that there is a right answer, and only that answer can be correct. She explained that this representation is not universally correct. She used an example of two paper clips. If you add one paper clip and one paper clip you end up with two paper clips. We could all agree that the logic made sense. She then grabbed a container of play dough, and had one ball of play dough and added one ball of play dough, and when she put them together she had… one ball of play dough! In that perspective 1 + 1 = 0. She challenged us to think that the way we are teaching mathematics is limiting our student’s creativity. She also shared a resource on math fairs, with examples of what she has done in her university classes.

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Treaty 4 students share their work from their session Colonialism on Canvas.

The second session I attended was Smudging in Schools by Jeff Cappo. He shared knowledge on smudging, the importance of smudging in schools, and then we participated in a smudge. He spoke on how important it is to make a connection with our Indigenous youth, and to make smudging more normalized. He explained about how smudging takes the negative out of you and leaves it with positive. I participated in this session with one of my student’s and we both discussed how smudging makes you feel grounded. Cappo spoke about the reasons why we smudge, and how we have to be doing it inside the schools… not outside, because that leaves the wrong message. Smudging outside is saying that it is not something that is inclusive to the school, and does not have the spirit of reconciliation.

“The primary objective of smudging in schools are aimed at:

  • Promotion of health and balanced lifestyles of those we are with
  • Creating cultural awareness and aiding in the process of gaining a sense of cultural identity”

– Jeff Cappo

The third session I participated in was a session I have done before, but still learned new things when I attended. I listened to Edward Doolittle speak on the Peach, Stone, Bowl game. I was urged to attend this session because one of my grade ten students wanted to learn the game so that she could teach our math class this semester! I was excited for this to happen, and figured I could use a refresher on how the game works. Doolittle spent a great deal of time speaking about the intent of the game and the importance of language. He spoke to us in Mohawk, and explained that we do this best with what we have available. He spoke on the creation story, and how all comes from that. Last year he shared the Iroquois Creation story, and told us that before we begin we have to remember that all comes from here. During this session he explained a cultural perspective on math from Alan Bishop  that focus’ on 6 areas: measuring, counting, locating, designing, playing and explaining. This was a common theme, as it came up in the previous session on math I attended as well. Doolittle, like Graham, also discussed how our perspectives need to change. The game he explained was about probability, and he used this idea to show that our world is so much more complex than the theory that mathematics over simplifies.

“This was the best that I could do – people are scared to do Indigenous teaching in their classroom because they are scared they won’t do it right – that shouldn’t stop us from trying” – Edward Doolittle

The last session of the day was spent with Info Red, aka Brad Bellegarde. He shared his session Rap as the New Buffalo. This was a fantastic way to end the day because he was very funny and we were all excited to hear him rap. Again the topic of language came up, as he began listing the five dialects we have in Treaty 4. He greeted us in numerous languages and showed us how easy it is to be more inclusive with our language.

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Treaty 4 students with Brad Bellegarde

All together the day left me filling full – my mind was full of new information, my heart was full watching my student’s passion, my soul was full because I felt like I was truly participating in what I was passionate about, and my stomach was full because we made a quick stop at the Bannock House on the way home for Indian Tacos and Maple Bacon Moose Ears. Days like this are so incredibly important for all involved, and I strongly suggest participating in future years. If you would like to learn more about what happened at the Treaty Ed Camp you can follow the hashtag on twitter for more snippets of what was learned!

“It is precisely because education was the primary tool of oppression of Aboriginal people, and mis-education of all Canadians, that we have concluded that education holds the key to reconciliation” – Justice Murray Sinclair

Orange Shirt Day 2018

30 Sep

 

As a teacher, September is a time that is very busy for me as I begin to get ready for the upcoming school year. September is filled with change – from new classes to teach, and new students to meet, clubs to plan for and events to run. It can be very stressful for me, but it is also a very exciting time as I, and I hope the students, begin to get back into the swing of the school year. Today, September 30th, I am taking time to reflect and remember that going back to school has not always been an exciting time for many members of our society – going back, or beginning to attend, a residential school would have had a significantly different feeling.

September 30th is recognized as Orange Shirt Day, and it honours the story of Phyllis Webstad. If you have not listened to Phyllis’ story, I encourage you to listen below.

The voice of the First Nations people in Canada has been long silenced. I am very fortunate to work in a school where I am able to have discussions on reconciliation with some of the youth in our city. Our school recognized Orange Shirt Day and we participated in a liturgy to focus on the voice of Residential School Students. Last year I had a group of very passionate grade 12 students who began our Treaty 4 group with me and a few colleagues. This year, I was concerned that there would be lack of interest, but our group increased in size. They took the leadership to lead our school and educate them on reconciliation, focusing on how they will use their voices this school year.

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Some of the members for the Vanier Treaty 4 club this year.

Our liturgy took place in the gym, and had a much different tone than other liturgies. A main difference was that we seated the students in a circle on the ground, rather than in our bleachers. Taking time in the day to talk about Reconciliation, to share knowledge, and give voice to students who have been long silenced in our country, was a very powerful moment.

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I wanted to be able to share our presentation as a resource for other teachers, or anyone who is interested in further educating themselves. The slideshow includes resources beyond the document that can even further your education. You can find this slideshow here.

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Some of the staff and students at Vanier who participated in Orange Shirt Day.

The Treaty 4 group made many challenges to the staff and students during the liturgy. They challenged everyone to become familiar with the 94 Calls to Action, and to listen to listen to Read the TRC Report. They also challenged Vanier to fill their social media with facts on Residential Schools, and to share what they have learned with at least one other person. We already had a Twitter begun, which has documented their journey for the past year, but we also began an Instagram page to help spread the awareness further. We challenged the school to use their voice for something important this year, and had them fill orange shirts with how they plan to do this (pictures to come). The last challenge we proposed to the school was to learn 100 days of Cree. We discussed the importance of revitalizing Indigenous languages. Since our presentation focused so strongly on voice, it was very suited to begin this challenge. Taking Cree 100 this semester has also motivated me to help the Treaty 4 group do this, as I myself am focusing on learning Cree this semester. The group made their first video, and will be posting each day to learn a new phrase or word. You can follow our journey on twitter or on instagram!

In closing I would like to quote Justice Murray Sinclair when he stated, “Education has gotten us into this mess, and education will get us out.”

What is Ownership?

24 Sep

The first assignment for my Cree 100 class is to respond to the Ted Talk given by April Charlo on Indigenous Language Revitalization.

Language is a powerful tool that is a component to the foundation of all cultures. The way we use this language is also very powerful. Language helps us communicate and it helps to pass on knowledge. Taking Cree this semester has been very important to me for numerous reasons. The first reason is that I am a teacher, and as Charlo mentions in her Ted Talk, it is important to revitalize the language so that this knowledge does not become lost to us. The second reason is that my ancestors spoke Cree, and this is a knowledge that has been lost in my family. My aim this semester is to regain some of this knowledge so I may pass it on to my students and family.

Since Aboriginal Traditions put great focus on Oral Tradition, it is obvious that the language holds much more than just literal translation. Last semester I took INDG 228 which was a class on Reconciliation and Indigenous Resurgence in Canada. Through this class I was able to listen to Willie Ermine speak on education and the Cree language. He spoke of how the language was sacred, and that there was knowledge embedded in it. When looking at learning Cree I have kept this in mind.

Resurgence and revitalization of Indigenous language is one step that can begin to repair the broken relationships we have in our country. Whenever we discuss broken relationships, immediately I begin thinking of Treaties. Everything in our society today goes back to the Treaties, and the promises that are not kept within them. When talking about the importance of language, it is easy to make connections to the Treaties. When the Treaties were created and signed, issues were much greater than just a language gap.

In the Ted Talk she speaks about how First Nations traditions did not have a concept of ownership, which in turn affects how we can use the language. It is difficult to understand, then, how Treaties could have been fully understood by both parties at the time of signing. Of course, Treaties are not the first time in Canada that land was now “owned”. The idea of ownership was introduced early with the Doctrine of Discovery, but couldn’t even be comprehended by the First Nations people.

Charlo speaks about how she learned that you cannot own things that are from nature. In order to understand Indigenous languages you also must understand the culture. You can’t merely translate words, because the meaning and knowledge that goes with those words might become lost. When listening to Willie Ermine speak, he discussed how there are knowledge bundles that encompass all things and how they relate to the world around them. There is a deeper richness to the words then, as they become more descriptive.

I am very excited to begin my journey learning Cree. Revitalization of languages, and in turn commitment to learning and understanding the First Nations culture, is an important step in Reconciliation. It is important that we begin teaching and learning these languages in the education system as it has been mandated to be done so by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action.

We call on the federal government to draft new Aboriginal education legislation with the full participation and informed consent of Aboriginal peoples. The new legislation would include a commitment to sufficient funding and would incorporate the following principles:

iv. Protecting the right to Aboriginal languages, including the teaching of Aboriginal languages as credit courses.